No. 175: Michaël Borremans

Episode No. 175 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Michaël Borremans.

On March 15, the Dallas Museum of Art opens “Michaël Borremans: As sweet as it gets,” the first career-length survey of Borremans’ work. Curated by the DMA’s Jeffrey Grove, the show originated in Borremans’ native Belgium at the Center for Fine Arts, Brussels (BOZAR). It will be on view at the DMA through July 5. The exhibition catalogue was published by Hatje Cantz.

Borremans is one of Europe’s most important painters. His vaguely surreal, Old Masters-informed paintings imagine worlds both unlikely and possible. His work has been the subject of solo shows at museums in Tokyo,  Ghent, Hanover, Amsterdam, Basel and more. American museums holding Borremanses include MOCA, the MFA Boston, the Museum of Modern Art, New York, SFMOMA and the Walker Art Center.

Air date: March 12, 2015.

Michaël Borremans, The Angel, 2014.

Michaël Borremans, The Angel, 2014.

Diego Velazquez, Portrait of Queen Mariana, c. 1656. Collection of the Meadows Museum, Dallas.

Diego Velazquez, Portrait of Queen Mariana, c. 1656. Collection of the Meadows Museum, Dallas.

Michaël Borremans, 10 and 11, 2006.

Michaël Borremans, 10 and 11, 2006.

Michaël Borremans, Automat (1), 2008.

Michaël Borremans, Automat (1), 2008.

Michaël Borremans, The Loan, 2011.

Michaël Borremans, The Loan, 2011.

Michaël Borremans, The GIant, 2007.

Michaël Borremans, The Giant, 2007.

Michaël Borremans, A2, 2004.

Michaël Borremans, A2, 2004.

Gerhard Richter, Betty, 1988. Collection of the Saint Louis Art Museum.

Gerhard Richter, Betty, 1988. Collection of the Saint Louis Art Museum.

Michaël Borremans, The Angel, 2013.

Michaël Borremans, The Angel, 2013.

Michaël Borremans, Hornet, 2008.

Michaël Borremans, Hornet, 2008.

Michaël Borremans, untitled, 2008.

Michaël Borremans, untitled, 2008.

Michaël Borremans, Mask, 2008.

Michaël Borremans, Mask, 2008.

Michaël Borremans, The Trees, 2008.

Michaël Borremans, The Trees, 2008.

Gerhard Richter, Reader, 1994. Collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Gerhard Richter, Reader, 1994. Collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Michaël Borremans, The Bodies, 2005.

Michaël Borremans, The Bodies, 2005.

Michaël Borremans, The Devil's Dress, 2011. Collection of the Dallas Museum of Art.

Michaël Borremans, The Devil’s Dress, 2011. Collection of the Dallas Museum of Art.

Michaël Borremans, The Nude, 2010.

Michaël Borremans, The Nude, 2010.

Edouard Manet, The Dead Toreador, c. 1864. Collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Edouard Manet, The Dead Toreador, c. 1864. Collection of the National Gallery of Art, Washington.

Andrea Mantegna, Dead Christ, c. 1480.

Andrea Mantegna, Dead Christ, c. 1480.

Michaël Borremans, The House of Opportunity, 2004.

Michaël Borremans, The House of Opportunity, 2004.

Michaël Borremans, In the Louvre -- The House of Opportunity, 2003.

Michaël Borremans, In the Louvre — The House of Opportunity, 2003.

Michaël Borremans, 3-D House of Opportunities, 2006.

Michaël Borremans, 3-D House of Opportunities, 2006.

Michaël Borremans, The Journey (Lower Tatra), 2003.

Michaël Borremans, The Journey (Lower Tatra), 2003.

The German - Dreiten teil

Michaël Borremans, The Skirt (2), 2005.

Michaël Borremans, The Skirt (2), 2005.

Michaël Borremans, Four Fairies, 2003.

Michaël Borremans, Four Fairies, 2003.

Rene Magritte, Time Transfixed, 1938. Collection of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Rene Magritte, Time Transfixed, 1938. Collection of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Rene Magritte, The Lovers, 1928.

Rene Magritte, The Lovers, 1928.

Michaël Borremans, Eating the Beard, 2010.

Michaël Borremans, Eating the Beard, 2010.

Rene Magritte, Young Girl Eating a Bird (The Pleasure), 1927.

Rene Magritte, Young Girl Eating a Bird (The Pleasure), 1927.

3 thoughts on “No. 175: Michaël Borremans

  1. Great conversation with Borremans. I just wished that the narrator could ask more about the painting’s relationships with film, especially the those that Borremans has made. Perhaps bresson’s L’argent is one example to mention as it exposes the idea of slowing down of time and the language of painting. Just curious of what he would say to that besides his relationships with old masters. Thank you.

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  2. Really enjoyed this talk, I wish I could make it to the show in Dallas. Who was the Belgium painter he mentioned, he said talked about his work around the turn of the century. It sounded like Leon Speer, not sure.

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  3. I was lucky enough to see his show in Dallas in it’s last few days. And I’m so glad to have found an interview with him here! Fantastic stuff.
    Also, I believe the Belgium artist he mentioned is Leon Spilliaert.

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