These are five of the seven pictures Dorothea Lange took of Florence Thompson in Nipomo, Calif. in February, 1936. Thompson was a pea-picker and mother of seven children. Ever since Lange took her iconic photograph of Thompson — shown above in the best-known form, and at bottom in un-modified form (note the thumb in the lower right) — she’s been known as the Migrant Mother. These are five of the seven known Lange photographs of Thompson. Each is in the collection of the Library of Congress. 

Tonight most PBS stations will premiere an "American Masters" documentary on the life and work of Dorothea Lange. Titled "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," the film looks at Lange’s life from her upbringing outside New York City, to her emergence as a major American photographer. Lange is best-known for her work chronicling the Dust Bowl era, but her oeuvre includes much more, including pictures of Depression-era labor strife, the internment of Japanese-Americans and early environmentalist documentary photography. Such was Lange’s stature that just after she died in 1966 the Museum of Modern Art devoted just its sixth retrospective of a photographer’s career to her work. 

Taylor was the lead guest on last week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast. She and host Tyler Green discussed the documentary and Lange’s life and work.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


Labor Day clips

The Modern Art Notes Podcast’s Labor Day weekend clip show features segments with artists John Divola and Kelly Richardson

Next month the Los Angeles-based Divola returns to New York with an exhibition titled “Clive Wearing’s Dilemma.” It will open at Wallspace gallery on September 5 and will run through October 25. The show features a body of work that was included in the recent three-venue retrospective of Divola’s work in southern California. That exhibition revealed Divola to be one of the most significant artists of his generation.

Richardson and host Tyler Green talked on the occasion of a mid-career survey of her work, which was then at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo. Richardson’s “Mariner 9,” a spectacular installation that imagines the surface of Mars, is now on view at the Laing Art Gallery in Newcastle, England, and “Legion,” a version of the retrospective that touched down in the U.S. is at the Contemporary Art Gallery Vancouver in British Columbia through September 7.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features documentary filmmaker Dyanna Taylor and art historian and author Judith Zilczer. 

Taylor is the director of the forthcoming PBS "American Masters" documentary on the life and work of Dorothea Lange. Titled "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," the film looks at Lange’s life from her upbringing outside New York City, to her emergence as a major American photographer. Lange is best-known for her work chronicling the Dust Bowl era, but her oeuvre includes much more, including pictures of Depression-era labor strife, the internment of Japanese-Americans and early environmentalist documentary photography. Such was Lange’s stature that just after she died in 1966 the Museum of Modern Art devoted just its sixth retrospective of a photographer’s career to her work. 

"Grab a Hunk of Lightning" premieres on PBS stations this Friday, August 29. Check your local listings to see if your PBS station is airing it at that time.

Taylor has won five Emmy awards for her work as a cinematographer and director of photography, and as also won a Peabody Award for the “American Masters” episode “Winter Dreams: F. Scott Fitzgerald.” She’s currently at work on a documentary about James Turrell and Roden Crater. Taylor also happens to be Lange and husband Paul Taylor’s granddaughter. 

Today MANPodcast.com will be spotlighting one of Lange’s late, great series, “Death of a Valley,” which Lange made with Pirkle Jones. The series chronicles the destruction of Monticello, Calif. in the Berryessa Valley, which federal authorities emptied, demolished and filled with water to make Lake Berryessa. Jones and Lange made the series in 1956 and Aperture published it in 1960. It’s one of the great photographic portfolios of the post-war era, and is now in the collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. These images show the end of Monticello and the Berryessa Valley. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


Dorothea Lange on PBS' "American Masters"

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features documentary filmmaker Dyanna Taylor and art historian and author Judith Zilczer. 

Taylor is the director of the forthcoming PBS "American Masters" documentary on the life and work of Dorothea Lange. Titled "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," the film looks at Lange’s life from her upbringing outside New York City, to her emergence as a major American photographer. Lange is best-known for her work chronicling the Dust Bowl era, but her oeuvre includes much more, including pictures of Depression-era labor strife, the internment of Japanese-Americans and early environmentalist documentary photography. Such was Lange’s stature that just after she died in 1966 the Museum of Modern Art devoted just its sixth retrospective of a photographer’s career to her work. 

"Grab a Hunk of Lightning" premieres on PBS stations this Friday, August 29. Check your local listings to see if your PBS station is airing it at that time.

Taylor has won five Emmy awards for her work as a cinematographer and director of photography, and as also won a Peabody Award for the “American Masters” episode “Winter Dreams: F. Scott Fitzgerald.” She’s currently at work on a documentary about James Turrell and Roden Crater. Taylor also happens to be Lange and husband Paul Taylor’s granddaughter. 

This is a portrait of Lange taken by Pirkle Jones in Monticello, Calif. as the two photographers worked on their 1956 “Death of a Valley” project. Check out MANPodcast.com all day today for images from the series!

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features documentary filmmaker Dyanna Taylor and art historian and author Judith Zilczer. 

Taylor is the director of the forthcoming PBS "American Masters" documentary on the life and work of Dorothea Lange. Titled "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," the film looks at Lange’s life from her upbringing outside New York City, to her emergence as a major American photographer. Lange is best-known for her work chronicling the Dust Bowl era, but her oeuvre includes much more, including pictures of Depression-era labor strife, the internment of Japanese-Americans and early environmentalist documentary photography. Such was Lange’s stature that just after she died in 1966 the Museum of Modern Art devoted just its sixth retrospective of a photographer’s career to her work. 

"Grab a Hunk of Lightning" premieres on PBS stations this Friday, August 29. Check your local listings to see if your PBS station is airing it at that time.

Taylor has won five Emmy awards for her work as a cinematographer and director of photography, and as also won a Peabody Award for the “American Masters” episode “Winter Dreams: F. Scott Fitzgerald.” She’s currently at work on a documentary about James Turrell and Roden Crater. Taylor also happens to be Lange and husband Paul Taylor’s granddaughter. 

Today MANPodcast.com will be spotlighting one of Lange’s late, great series, “Death of a Valley,” which Lange made with Pirkle Jones. The series chronicles the destruction of Monticello, Calif. in the Berryessa Valley, which federal authorities emptied, demolished and filled with water to make Lake Berryessa. Jones and Lange made the series in 1956 and Aperture published it in 1960. It’s one of the great photographic portfolios of the post-war era, and is now in the collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. These images detail the violence perpetuated on the emptying valley. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features documentary filmmaker Dyanna Taylor and art historian and author Judith Zilczer. 

Taylor is the director of the forthcoming PBS "American Masters" documentary on the life and work of Dorothea Lange. Titled "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," the film looks at Lange’s life from her upbringing outside New York City, to her emergence as a major American photographer. Lange is best-known for her work chronicling the Dust Bowl era, but her oeuvre includes much more, including pictures of Depression-era labor strife, the internment of Japanese-Americans and early environmentalist documentary photography. Such was Lange’s stature that just after she died in 1966 the Museum of Modern Art devoted just its sixth retrospective of a photographer’s career to her work. 

"Grab a Hunk of Lightning" premieres on PBS stations this Friday, August 29. Check your local listings to see if your PBS station is airing it at that time.

Taylor has won five Emmy awards for her work as a cinematographer and director of photography, and as also won a Peabody Award for the “American Masters” episode “Winter Dreams: F. Scott Fitzgerald.” She’s currently at work on a documentary about James Turrell and Roden Crater. Taylor also happens to be Lange and husband Paul Taylor’s granddaughter. 

Today MANPodcast.com will be spotlighting one of Lange’s late, great series, “Death of a Valley,” which Lange made with Pirkle Jones. The series chronicles the destruction of Monticello, Calif. in the Berryessa Valley, which federal authorities emptied, demolished and filled with water to make Lake Berryessa. Jones and Lange made the series in 1956 and Aperture published it in 1960. It’s one of the great photographic portfolios of the post-war era, and is now in the collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. These images detail the beginning of preparations to destroy the town.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features documentary filmmaker Dyanna Taylor and art historian and author Judith Zilczer. 

Taylor is the director of the forthcoming PBS "American Masters" documentary on the life and work of Dorothea Lange. Titled "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," the film looks at Lange’s life from her upbringing outside New York City, to her emergence as a major American photographer. Lange is best-known for her work chronicling the Dust Bowl era, but her oeuvre includes much more, including pictures of Depression-era labor strife, the internment of Japanese-Americans and early environmentalist documentary photography. Such was Lange’s stature that just after she died in 1966 the Museum of Modern Art devoted just its sixth retrospective of a photographer’s career to her work. 

"Grab a Hunk of Lightning" premieres on PBS stations this Friday, August 29. Check your local listings to see if your PBS station is airing it at that time.

Taylor has won five Emmy awards for her work as a cinematographer and director of photography, and as also won a Peabody Award for the “American Masters” episode “Winter Dreams: F. Scott Fitzgerald.” She’s currently at work on a documentary about James Turrell and Roden Crater. Taylor also happens to be Lange and husband Paul Taylor’s granddaughter. 

Today MANPodcast.com will be spotlighting one of Lange’s late, great series, “Death of a Valley,” which Lange made with Pirkle Jones. The series chronicles the destruction of Monticello, Calif. in the Berryessa Valley, which federal authorities emptied, demolished and filled with water to make Lake Berryessa. Jones and Lange made the series in 1956 and Aperture published it in 1960. It’s one of the great photographic portfolios of the post-war era, and is now in the collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. These images are from the beginning of the series, when Lange and Jones are establishing what was lost.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features documentary filmmaker Dyanna Taylor and art historian and author Judith Zilczer. 

Zilczer discusses her new book about Willem de Kooning. Titled "A Way of Living: The Art of Willem de Kooning," the book is just out from Phaidon. Zilczer was a curator at the Hirshhorn for nearly 30 years, where she particularly tended to the institution’s remarkable trove of de Kooning paintings and drawings.

Below the book/slip-cover for Zilczer’s new book is de Kooning’s Figure and Landscape No. 2 (1951), one of the paintings that Zilczer and host Tyler Green discuss on this week’s program. It’s in the collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


Dorothea Lange on PBS' "American Masters"

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features documentary filmmaker Dyanna Taylor and art historian and author Judith Zilczer. 

Taylor is the director of the forthcoming PBS "American Masters" documentary on the life and work of Dorothea Lange. Titled "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," the film looks at Lange’s life from her upbringing outside New York City, to her emergence as a major American photographer. Lange is best-known for her work chronicling the Dust Bowl era, but her oeuvre includes much more, including pictures of Depression-era labor strife, the internment of Japanese-Americans and early environmentalist documentary photography. Such was Lange’s stature that just after she died in 1966 the Museum of Modern Art devoted just its sixth retrospective of a photographer’s career to her work. 

"Grab a Hunk of Lightning" premieres on PBS stations this Friday, August 29. Check your local listings to see if your PBS station is airing it at that time.

Taylor has won five Emmy awards for her work as a cinematographer and director of photography, and as also won a Peabody Award for the “American Masters” episode “Winter Dreams: F. Scott Fitzgerald.” She’s currently at work on a documentary about James Turrell and Roden Crater. Taylor also happens to be Lange and husband Paul Taylor’s granddaughter. 

Throughout the Depression Lange was interested in billboards — one of America’s first mass media — and in the ways the messages on the billboards contrasted with the conditions she found on her travels. Lange captioned this picture Toward Los Angeles, California (1937)Keep an eye on MANPodcast.com today for more of Lange’s pictures of billboards.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features documentary filmmaker Dyanna Taylor and art historian and author Judith Zilczer. 

Taylor is the director of the forthcoming PBS "American Masters" documentary on the life and work of Dorothea Lange. Titled "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," the film looks at Lange’s life from her upbringing outside New York City, to her emergence as a major American photographer. Lange is best-known for her work chronicling the Dust Bowl era, but her oeuvre includes much more, including pictures of Depression-era labor strife, the internment of Japanese-Americans and early environmentalist documentary photography. Such was Lange’s stature that just after she died in 1966 the Museum of Modern Art devoted just its sixth retrospective of a photographer’s career to her work. 

"Grab a Hunk of Lightning" premieres on PBS stations this Friday, August 29. Check your local listings to see if your PBS station is airing it at that time.

Taylor has won five Emmy awards for her work as a cinematographer and director of photography, and as also won a Peabody Award for the “American Masters” episode “Winter Dreams: F. Scott Fitzgerald.” She’s currently at work on a documentary about James Turrell and Roden Crater. Taylor also happens to be Lange and husband Paul Taylor’s granddaughter. 

Throughout the Depression Lange was interested in billboards — one of America’s first mass media — and in the ways the messages on the billboards contrasted with the conditions she found on her travels. Lange captioned this picture Camped in the rain behind billboard: three families, fourteen children. On U.S. 99. Near Famosa [or Vamosa], Kern County, California. Keep an eye on MANPodcast.com today for more of Lange’s pictures of billboards.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at: