This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast leads off with Los Angeles County Museum of Art curator Timothy O. Benson.

Benson is the curator of "Expressionism in Germany and France: From Van Gogh to Kandinsky." The show reveals how expressionism, typically considered a German movement, had its roots in late 19th-century French art and then presents how central European artists discovered, learned from and expanded upon developments in France. 

It’s on view through September 14. The exhibition’s catalogue, published by Prestel, is terrific. Amazon offers it for $50.

The artwork at the top of this post is the most important painting of the 20th century: Henri Matisse’s Blue Nude, Memory of Biskra (1907). It isn’t in Benson’s show, but it’s influence is evident and often overt. Included here are some of the many ways artists engaged with Blue Nude. All are in “Expressionism in Germany in France.” From top-to-bottom:

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Dodo Playing with Her Fingers (1909). Collection of the Milwaukee Art Museum;

Erich Heckel, Scene in the Woods (1910), Plate 2 of the portfolio “Die Brucke VI (1911), Collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art;

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Reclining Nude in Front of Mirror (1909-10). Collection of Brucke Museum; and

Max Pechstein, Dancers and Bathers at a Forest Pond, 1912. Collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


French & German Expressionism

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast leads off with Los Angeles County Museum of Art curator Timothy O. Benson.

Benson is the curator of "Expressionism in Germany and France: From Van Gogh to Kandinsky." The show reveals how expressionism, typically considered a German movement, had its roots in late 19th-century French art and then presents how central European artists discovered, learned from and expanded upon developments in France. 

It’s on view through September 14. The exhibition’s catalogue, published by Prestel, is terrific. Amazon offers it for $50.

This is a detail of German painter Karl Schmidt-Rottluff’s Reflective Woman (1912). The painting suggests how Schmidt-Rottluff learned from French artists and art movements, including from Cezanne’s brushwork and the Fauves’ use of bright, flat colors. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist and organizer Mary Miss.

Miss is the founder of City as Living Laboratory, an organization that provides a platform for artists, scientists, planners, policy makers and the general public to be more environmentally aware. In conjunction with Marfa Dialogues St. Louis, a program of the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, Miss will be leading a walk through central Saint Louis on August 2. Marfa Dialogues St. Louis events run from July 30 through August 3. 

This post features an earthwork Miss created in 1975. She and host Tyler Green discussed it on this week’s program. The first three images here are drawings Miss created of the work. They are followed by the untitled piece as it is installed on the grounds of the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin College in Ohio. The drawings and the work are all in AMAM’s collection. The bottom image is a Google Satellite picture that shows where the work is installed.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast leads off with Los Angeles County Museum of Art curator Timothy O. Benson.

Benson is the curator of "Expressionism in Germany and France: From Van Gogh to Kandinsky." The show reveals how expressionism, typically considered a German movement, had its roots in late 19th-century French art and then presents how central European artists discovered, learned from and expanded upon developments in France. 

It’s on view through September 14. The exhibition’s catalogue, published by Prestel, is terrific. Amazon offers it for $50.

Benson and host Tyler Green discuss German artist Erich Heckel at particular length on this week’s show. These three Heckels show how the painter moved through French expressionism in order to arrive at his own distinct style. At top is the 1905 The Elbe at Dresden, which reveals Heckel’s interest in neo-impressionism. Then the 1909 Sand Diggers on the Tiber shows Heckel pairing dramatic brushstrokes (a la van Gogh) with spare but bright colors (a la the Matisse-led Fauves) with a dramatic perspective that is his own. Finally, in the 1910 Girl with a Doll Heckel nods at the French presentation of the nude, but otherwise the paint-handling, color and psychological content is all Heckel’s. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


French & German Expressionism

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast leads off with Los Angeles County Museum of Art curator Timothy O. Benson.

Benson is the curator of "Expressionism in Germany and France: From Van Gogh to Kandinsky." The show reveals how expressionism, typically considered a German movement, had its roots in late 19th-century French art and then presents how central European artists discovered, learned from and expanded upon developments in France. 

It’s on view through September 14. The exhibition’s catalogue, published by Prestel, is terrific. Amazon offers it for $50.

Among the topics that Benson and host Tyler Green discuss on this week’s show is Benson’s use of works on paper to demonstrate how central European artists translated French ideas into what has come to be known as ‘German Expressionism.’ This is a detail of Gabriele Münter’s woodcut Aurelie (1906). Münter, who was German, dated Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky and studied at the Paris academy run by Henri Matisse. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast leads off with Los Angeles County Museum of Art curator Timothy O. Benson.

Benson is the curator of "Expressionism in Germany and France: From Van Gogh to Kandinsky." The show reveals how expressionism, typically considered a German movement, had its roots in late 19th-century French art and then presents how central European artists discovered, learned from and expanded upon developments in France. 

It’s on view through September 14. The exhibition’s catalogue, published by Prestel, is terrific. Amazon offers it for $50.

These are three of the pictures Benson and host Tyler Green discuss on this week’s show. At top is Henri Matisse’s Open Window, Collioure (1905). Max Pechstein’s Young Girl (1908, click to expand) is at bottom left. Next to it is Paula Modersohn-Becker’s Girl with Flower Vases (1907).

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


French & German Expressionism

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Los Angeles County Museum of Art curator Timothy O. Benson and Mary Miss.

Benson is the curator of "Expressionism in Germany and France: From Van Gogh to Kandinsky." The show reveals how expressionism, typically considered a German movement, had its roots in late 19th-century French art and then presents how central European artists discovered, learned from and expanded upon developments in France. 

It’s on view through September 14. The exhibition’s catalogue, published by Prestel, is terrific. Amazon offers it for $50.

The second segment is a conversation with Mary Miss, the artist who founded City as Living Laboratory, an organization that provides a platform for artists, scientists, planners, policy makers and the general public to be more environmentally aware. In conjunction with Marfa Dialogues St. Louis, a program of the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, Miss will be leading a walk through central Saint Louis on August 2. Marfa Dialogues St. Louis events run from July 30 through August 3. 

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin. 
Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. 
I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 
Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim.
In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 
This is a picture from Fiskin’s "31 Views of San Bernadino" (1974) series.
How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin. 

Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. 

I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 

Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim.

In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 

This is a picture from Fiskin’s "31 Views of San Bernadino" (1974) series.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin. 
Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. 
I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 
Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim.
In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 
This is a picture from Fiskin’s "Military Architecture" (1974) series.
How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin. 

Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. 

I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 

Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim.

In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 

This is a picture from Fiskin’s "Military Architecture" (1974) series.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Michael Duncan. 
Duncan and host Tyler Green discuss “An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle,” an exhibition Duncan co-curated with Christopher Wagstaff. The show debuted at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento, traveled to the Grey Art Gallery at New York University, and is on view through August 17 at the American University Museum in Washington, DC. It will conclude its tour this fall at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. Siglio Press recently published Duncan’s marvelous "O! Tricky Cad and Other Jessoterica," a visual wander through Jess’s exquisitely composed collages.
This is Jess’ 1960 cover for Robert Duncan’s “The Opening of the Field,” a book of poetry published by Grove Press.
How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 

The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Michael Duncan. 

Duncan and host Tyler Green discuss “An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle,” an exhibition Duncan co-curated with Christopher Wagstaff. The show debuted at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento, traveled to the Grey Art Gallery at New York University, and is on view through August 17 at the American University Museum in Washington, DC. It will conclude its tour this fall at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. Siglio Press recently published Duncan’s marvelous "O! Tricky Cad and Other Jessoterica," a visual wander through Jess’s exquisitely composed collages.

This is Jess’ 1960 cover for Robert Duncan’s “The Opening of the Field,” a book of poetry published by Grove Press.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at: