Posts tagged war

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Vija Celmins.
Celmins’ work is prominently featured in "Damage Control: Art and Destruction Since 1950" at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. The exhibition, which was curated by Kerry Brougher and Russell Ferguson, explores the ways in which artists considered and used the Cold War-era threat of destruction in their work. Five of Celmins’ works about World War II and post-war destruction are included in the exhibition, which is on view through May 25, 2014. 
In 2014, the Latvian National Museum of Art will hold an exhibition of Celmins’ work as the flagship event of Riga’s turn as the 2014 European Capital of Culture. Celmins was born in Latvia in 1938, but along with her family was forced to flee the country in 1944. The Celminses came to the United States — specifically Indianapolis — in 1948.
The image above is Celmins’ Hiroshima (1968) from the collection of the Museum of Modern Art. It’s one of the five Celminses in “Damage Control.” 
Celmins’ work has been the subject of numerous major museum exhibitions, including a 1992 retrospective organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, a 1980 retrospective organized by the Newport Harbor Art Museum, a 2006 drawings retrospective organized by the Centre Pompidou in Paris and “Television and Disaster, 1964-68,” organized by the Menil Collection.
How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast at: 
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Vija Celmins.

Celmins’ work is prominently featured in "Damage Control: Art and Destruction Since 1950" at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. The exhibition, which was curated by Kerry Brougher and Russell Ferguson, explores the ways in which artists considered and used the Cold War-era threat of destruction in their work. Five of Celmins’ works about World War II and post-war destruction are included in the exhibition, which is on view through May 25, 2014. 

In 2014, the Latvian National Museum of Art will hold an exhibition of Celmins’ work as the flagship event of Riga’s turn as the 2014 European Capital of Culture. Celmins was born in Latvia in 1938, but along with her family was forced to flee the country in 1944. The Celminses came to the United States — specifically Indianapolis — in 1948.

The image above is Celmins’ Hiroshima (1968) from the collection of the Museum of Modern Art. It’s one of the five Celminses in “Damage Control.” 

Celmins’ work has been the subject of numerous major museum exhibitions, including a 1992 retrospective organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, a 1980 retrospective organized by the Newport Harbor Art Museum, a 2006 drawings retrospective organized by the Centre Pompidou in Paris and “Television and Disaster, 1964-68,” organized by the Menil Collection.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast at: 


On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, Tehran-based artist Gohar Dashti talks about her photographs and how they address being Iranian in the wake of the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988). Dashti’s work is on view now in two exhibitions: "She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World" is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The exhibition was curated by Kristen Gresh and will be up through January 12, 2014. Amazon offers the show’s excellent catalogue for $30. 

At the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Dashti is in "About Face: Contemporary Portraiture," a survey of photographic portraiture since 2000. The show was organized by Jane L. Aspinwall and April M. Watson and will be on view through January 19. 2014.

The image above is a detail from a picture in Dashti’s 2008 series “Today’s life and war.” See 10 pictures from the series — including this one — at her website.

Please help us out! For about fifty weeks of the year we here at The Modern Art Notes Podcast want nothing more than for you to download and, hopefully, enjoy the show. But for a couple weeks each September we ask for a little bit of help: We offer up a survey that will help us learn about our audience and about ways to improve the program. It shouldn’t take more than five minutes. Please click here to fill it out!

Listen to this week’s program: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. See images of art discussed on the program. Also:


The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Tehran-based artist Gohar Dashti. Her work is on view now in two exhibitions: "She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World" is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The exhibition was curated by Kristen Gresh and will be up through January 12, 2014. Amazon offers the show’s excellent catalogue for $30. At the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Dashti is in "About Face: Contemporary Portraiture," a survey of photographic portraiture since 2000. The show was organized by Jane L. Aspinwall and April M. Watson and will be on view through January 19. 2014.
On this week’s MAN Podcast, Dashti tells us about her photographs and how they address being Iranian in the wake of the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988). Dashti was born in the war’s first year and believes that her generation is substantially defined by that armed conflict. One of the pictures Dashti and host Tyler Green discuss is above: Untitled #2 (2008) from Dashti’s “Today’s Life and War” series. 
Please help us out! For about fifty weeks of the year we here at The Modern Art Notes Podcast want nothing more than for you to download and, hopefully, enjoy the show. But for a couple weeks each September we ask for a little bit of help: We offer up a survey that will help us learn about our audience and about ways to improve the program. It shouldn’t take more than five minutes. Please click here to fill it out!
Listen to this week’s program: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. See images of art discussed on the program. Also:
subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunes,
via SoundCloud,
via Stitcher; or via
RSS. 

The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Tehran-based artist Gohar DashtiHer work is on view now in two exhibitions: "She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World" is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The exhibition was curated by Kristen Gresh and will be up through January 12, 2014. Amazon offers the show’s excellent catalogue for $30. At the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Dashti is in "About Face: Contemporary Portraiture," a survey of photographic portraiture since 2000. The show was organized by Jane L. Aspinwall and April M. Watson and will be on view through January 19. 2014.

On this week’s MAN Podcast, Dashti tells us about her photographs and how they address being Iranian in the wake of the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988). Dashti was born in the war’s first year and believes that her generation is substantially defined by that armed conflict. One of the pictures Dashti and host Tyler Green discuss is above: Untitled #2 (2008) from Dashti’s “Today’s Life and War” series. 

Please help us out! For about fifty weeks of the year we here at The Modern Art Notes Podcast want nothing more than for you to download and, hopefully, enjoy the show. But for a couple weeks each September we ask for a little bit of help: We offer up a survey that will help us learn about our audience and about ways to improve the program. It shouldn’t take more than five minutes. Please click here to fill it out!

Listen to this week’s program: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. See images of art discussed on the program. Also:


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights "Photography and the American Civil War" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Opening today, the exhibition surveys photography of and related to the conflict, including battlefield daguerreotypes, post-battle scenes and intense pictures of the dead and wounded. The program’s lead guest is Jeff Rosenheim, the curator of the exhibition and the author of the excellent book that accompanies it. The exhibition will be on view through September 2. Over 50 of the pictures in the show are available online.

Rosenheim is the curator in charge of the Met’s photography department. His primary focus is American photography: He facilitated the Met’s acquisitions of the complete archives of photographers Walker Evans in 1994 and Diane Arbus in 2007. 

This picture: As it turned out, the Civil War was a spectacular mechanism for spreading the still relatively new medium of photography. Soldiers lined up to have their photographs taken in their uniforms so that their parents back home would have something to remember them by (especially in case…). This is an example of the type: A picture of an unknown Union infantryman wearing a light-colored overcoat with a short cape. 

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See images of art discussed on the program.


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights "Photography and the American Civil War" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Opening on Tuesday, April 2, the exhibition surveys photography of and related to the conflict, including battlefield daguerreotypes, post-battle scenes and intense pictures of the dead and wounded. The program’s lead guest is Jeff Rosenheim, the curator of the exhibition and the author of the excellent book that accompanies it. The exhibition will be on view through September 2.

Rosenheim is the curator in charge of the Met’s photography department. His primary focus is American photography: He facilitated the Met’s acquisitions of the complete archives of photographers Walker Evans in 1994 and Diane Arbus in 2007. 

This picture: This is a detail from the famous "Cooper Union portrait" of Abraham Lincoln. It was made in Matthew Brady’s New York studio the same day Lincoln made his equally famous speech at Cooper Union.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See images of art discussed on the program.

Image: Matthew Brady, Abraham Lincoln, February 27, 1860 [the Cooper Union portrait]. Collection of the Library of Congress, Washington.


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights "Photography and the American Civil War" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Opening on Tuesday, April 2, the exhibition surveys photography of and related to the conflict, including battlefield daguerreotypes, post-battle scenes and intense pictures of the dead and wounded. The program’s lead guest is Jeff Rosenheim, the curator of the exhibition and the author of the excellent book that accompanies it. The exhibition will be on view through September 2.

Rosenheim is the curator in charge of the Met’s photography department. His primary focus is American photography: He facilitated the Met’s acquisitions of the complete archives of photographers Walker Evans in 1994 and Diane Arbus in 2007. 

This picture: This is a detail from Alexander Gardner’s famous Home of a Rebel Sharpshooter, Gettysburg, July 1863 from “Gardner’s Photographic Sketch Book of the War.” Art historians have long believed that Gardner moved the corpse to make this picture, but Rosenheim has a new idea about it, an idea he discusses with host Tyler Green on this week’s MAN Podcast.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See images of art discussed on the program.


The Metropolitan Museum of Art has just acquired this Civil War-era carte de visite of a Union soldier (shown here with verso). It will be included in the exhibition "Photography and the American Civil War," which opens Tuesday at the Met. 

The exhibition, and the accompanying catalogue, survey photography of and related to the war between the states, including battlefield daguerreotypes, post-battle scenes and intense pictures of the dead and wounded. Jeff Rosenheim, the curator of the exhibition and the author of the book that accompanies it, is the lead guest on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See images of art discussed on the program.

Image: Unknown photographer, Sergeant Alex Rogers with Battle Flag, Eighty-Third Pennsylvania Volunteers, Third Brigade, First Division, Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac, ca. 1863. Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.


Dmitri Baltermants, Russian, born Poland, 1912-1990 Attack Eastern Front WWII, 1941 Burst of Joy, Travis Air Force Base, California, March 17, 1973.

Episode No. 53 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast featured this exhibition when it debuted at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. It included almost 500 objects, images by more than 280 photographers on six continents, all of it covering 165 years of war. Anne Wilkes Tucker, the show’s co-curator (along with MFAH’s Will Michaels and Natalie Zelt), was the guest.

Listen to the “War/Photography” program: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloud or RSS. See more images discussed on the show.

latimes:

War photography, stretching from 1887 to now

Collected by the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY takes a look at more than 150 photos from wars following the advent of photography, from the horrors found on the field to the jubilant safe returns home.

The exhibit will be hosted by the Annenberg Space for Photography starting Saturday, March 23 through June 2 with free admission.

Photos: Dmitri Baltermants / Russian Photo Association, Al Chang, W. Eugene Smith / Black Star, Susan Meiselas / Magnum Photos, Sal Veder / Associated Press


This is the first international "A Day Without News," a day on which the international journalistic community mourns the loss of two colleagues in Syria a year ago today and brings attention to the dangers journalists face in war zones around the world. One of the goals of the campaign is to urge governments to better protect the journalists who inform us about our world.

The work of many brave photojournalists and artists was recently spotlighted in the landmark Museum of Fine Arts Houston exhibition "War Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and its Aftermath." The exhibition recently closed in Houston but will travel to Los Angeles, Washington, DC and to Brooklyn. The 600-page book that accompanies the exhibition is smart, intense, moving and scholarly.

Episode No. 53 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast featured the MFAH show, which included almost 500 objects, images by more than 280 photographers on six continents, all of it covering 165 years of war. Anne Wilkes Tucker, the show’s co-curator (along with MFAH’s Will Michaels and Natalie Zelt), was the guest.

To listen to the program: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunes, SoundCloud or RSS. See more images discussed on the show.

Image: Anja Niedringhaus, A U.S. Marine of the 1st Division carries a GI Joe mascot as a good luck charm in his backpack as his unit pushes further into the western part of Fallujah, Iraq (detail)November 14, 2004.


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features two new exhibitions that look at American art and the Civil War: "The Civil War and American Art" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum and "A Strange And Fearful Interest: Death, Mourning and Memory in the American Civil War" at the Huntington. 

While the SAAM show mostly focuses on painting, and while the Huntington show almost entirely features photography, there are photographs of the aftermath of Civil War battles in both shows. This picture, A Harvest of Death, Gettysburg (detail above, click to expand), was taken by Timothy O’Sullivan in July, 1863 in what was likely a former wheat or corn field (hence the picture’s title). It’s one of the most famous battlefield pictures of the war. The Chrysler Museum has a great print of the picture and it’s available in high-resolution here. Huntington curator Jenny Watts and I discuss why these images were so remarkable, and how they were seen and received by 19th-century audiences. 

To download the program to your PC/mobile device, click here. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunesSoundCloud or RSS. See images of art discussed on the show. Also, check out and ‘like’ our new Facebook page!

Image: Timothy O’Sullivan, A Harvest of Death (detail), July, 1863. Collection of the Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Va.