Posts tagged photography

Italian Futurism

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights "Italian Futurism, 1909-1944: Reconstructing the Universe" at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. It is the first overview of Italian Futurism to be presented in the United States. It’s on view through September 1.

The first guest is Guggenheim curator Vivien Greene, who organized the show. Greene’s previous exhibitions include “The Vorticists: Rebel Artists in London and New York, 1914–18,” (which she co-organized with Mark Antliff), “Utopia Matters: From Brotherhoods to Bauhaus” and “Divisionism/Neo-Impressionism: Arcadia and Anarchy.”

This is a detail from Filippo Masoero’s Descending over Saint Peter, ca. 1927–37 (possibly 1930–33). It’s an example of futurism’s late embrace of photography. Host Tyler Green and Greene discussed this issue at length on this week’s program.

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See more images of art discussed on the show.

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On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, artist Alison Rossiter discusses her work. Rossiter is featured in "What Is a Photograph?" an exhibition at the International Center of Photography in New York. The exhibition, which is on view through May 4, was curated by Carol Squiers. It looks at how over the last 40 years artists, often more interested in making an artwork than in specifically making a photograph, have probed the question of what a photograph can be.
Rossiter is a New York-based artist whose recent work has explored uses of expired photographic paper. She has exhibited extensively throughout the United States and Canada over the last 30 years and her work is in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the George Eastman House, the National Gallery of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.
This is Rossiter’s Defender Velour Black, expired January 1924, processed in 2013 (#2). On the program, Rossiter explains to host Tyler Green how she makes works such as this using expired photographic paper.
Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 
See more images of art discussed on the show.

On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, artist Alison Rossiter discusses her work. Rossiter is featured in "What Is a Photograph?" an exhibition at the International Center of Photography in New York. The exhibition, which is on view through May 4, was curated by Carol Squiers. It looks at how over the last 40 years artists, often more interested in making an artwork than in specifically making a photograph, have probed the question of what a photograph can be.

Rossiter is a New York-based artist whose recent work has explored uses of expired photographic paper. She has exhibited extensively throughout the United States and Canada over the last 30 years and her work is in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the George Eastman House, the National Gallery of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

This is Rossiter’s Defender Velour Black, expired January 1924, processed in 2013 (#2). On the program, Rossiter explains to host Tyler Green how she makes works such as this using expired photographic paper.

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on the show.


On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, artist Alison Rossiter discusses her work. Rossiter is featured in "What Is a Photograph?" an exhibition at the International Center of Photography in New York. The exhibition, which is on view through May 4, was curated by Carol Squiers. It looks at how over the last 40 years artists, often more interested in making an artwork than in specifically making a photograph, have probed the question of what a photograph can be.
Rossiter is a New York-based artist whose recent work has explored uses of expired photographic paper. She has exhibited extensively throughout the United States and Canada over the last 30 years and her work is in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the George Eastman House, the National Gallery of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.
This is Rossiter’s Kilborn Acme Kruxo, exact expiration date unknown, ca. 1940s, processed in 2013. On the program, Rossiter explains to host Tyler Green how she makes works such as this using expired photographic paper.
Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 
See more images of art discussed on the show.

On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, artist Alison Rossiter discusses her work. Rossiter is featured in "What Is a Photograph?" an exhibition at the International Center of Photography in New York. The exhibition, which is on view through May 4, was curated by Carol Squiers. It looks at how over the last 40 years artists, often more interested in making an artwork than in specifically making a photograph, have probed the question of what a photograph can be.

Rossiter is a New York-based artist whose recent work has explored uses of expired photographic paper. She has exhibited extensively throughout the United States and Canada over the last 30 years and her work is in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the George Eastman House, the National Gallery of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

This is Rossiter’s Kilborn Acme Kruxo, exact expiration date unknown, ca. 1940s, processed in 2013. On the program, Rossiter explains to host Tyler Green how she makes works such as this using expired photographic paper.

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on the show.


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features John Divola. Three Southern California museums are featuring a Divola retrospective this fall: The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (through July 6, 2014), the Pomona College Museum of Art (through December 22) and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art(through January 12, 2014). The exhibition catalogue was produced by the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and includes contributions from curators at all three museums, plus an interview with Divola conducted by the Tate’s Simon Baker. It is published by Delmonico Books Prestel (and it’s just $35 on Amazon).

The exhibitions are the first museum shows to examine Divola’s four-decade career. His influential work is among the first to merge painting, photography and conceptual practice. 

This is a detail from Divola’s As Far As I Could Get, 10 Seconds,  12_15_2010, 3:29 PM to 3:42 PM PST, 34.166301,-116.033714 (2010). Divola and host Tyler Green discuss this series on this weeks’ show!

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. See images of art discussed on the show here, or see even more on Divola’s website. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast at: 


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Museum of Modern Art curator Anne Umland. Her new exhibition, "Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926-1938," is on view at MoMA through January 12, 2014. The exhibition catalogue, published by MoMA, is excellent.

Umland is one of the world’s top curators of modern art. Her exhibitions include 2011’s “Picasso: Guitars 1912-1914,” 2008’s “Joan Miro: Painting and Anti-Painting 1927-37,” and a 2001 retrospective of Alberto Giacometti.

This is Magritte’s Attempting the Impossible (1928) and a photograph by an anonymous photographer of Magritte posing with the painting. (The picture was plainly ‘art designed’ by Magritte.) For more on another way in which Magritte was interested in photography, see this post on Modern Art Notes.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast at iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or via RSS. Stream the program at MANPodcast.com.


Jack Whitten

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Jack Whitten. Earlier this week the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University opened "Light Years: Jack Whitten, 1971-73." Curated by Katy Siegel, the exhibition examines the period during which Whitten began to use tools to “process” paint on canvas. The exhibition also includes small drawing studies and small works on canvas in which Whitten uses paint as a collage medium. “Light Years” will be on view through December 15.

In addition, Alexander Gray Associates in Chelsea  is debuting recent Whitten paintings in a show that will run through October 12. Whitten is also included in"Blues for Smoke," the Bennett Simpson-curated exhibition that will be at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus through December 29.

Whitten is among the leading painters of the post-abstract expressionism era. His work is distinguished by Whitten’s interest in experimenting with new techniques to apply and new ways to use paint on canvas. The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego will debut a Whitten retrospective in 2014.

On the second segment, Tehran-based artist Gohar Dashti talks about her photographs and how they address being Iranian in the wake of the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988). Dashti was born in the war’s first year and believes that her generation is substantially defined by that armed conflict. Her work is on view now in"She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World" at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The exhibition was curated by Kristen Gresh and will be on view through January 12, 2014. Amazon offers the show’s excellent catalogue for $30.

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The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. Special thanks to the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden library for its help with this week’s show.

Listen to this week’s program: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. See images of art discussed on the program. Also:

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David Maisel :: Photography

Check out the website of artist David Maisel, the second guest on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast. His new book "Black Maps: American Landscape and the Apocalyptic Sublime," is just out from Steidl. An exhibition by the same title of Maisel’s work is on view at the University of Colorado Art Museum through May 11. 

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features National Book Award-winning author Edward Ball talking about his new book "The Inventor and the Tycoon." The book tells the story of the relationship between photographer (and murderer) Eadweard Muybridge and railroad tycoon Leland Stanford, one of the Big Four who built the western half of the transcontinental railroad. Stanford famously commissioned Muybridge’s famous ‘animal locomotion’ pictures and stood by his man even as Muybridge faced a murder charge. Ball’s book weaves together the story of their lives, their success and their eventual enmity into a rollicking-good narrative.
This is one of the cards from the pictures Muybridge took for Stanford in 1878. See more of Muybridge’s work in the Stanford University Library collections. 
How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features National Book Award-winning author Edward Ball talking about his new book "The Inventor and the Tycoon." The book tells the story of the relationship between photographer (and murderer) Eadweard Muybridge and railroad tycoon Leland Stanford, one of the Big Four who built the western half of the transcontinental railroad. Stanford famously commissioned Muybridge’s famous ‘animal locomotion’ pictures and stood by his man even as Muybridge faced a murder charge. Ball’s book weaves together the story of their lives, their success and their eventual enmity into a rollicking-good narrative.

This is one of the cards from the pictures Muybridge took for Stanford in 1878. See more of Muybridge’s work in the Stanford University Library collections. 

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.


On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, Katherine Siegwarth discusses her new Amon Carter Museum exhibition "Big Pictures." The exhibition goes back to the 1860s to demonstrate that size in photography pre-dates the ‘Big Germans’ and that photographers have almost always wanted to make their prints bigger. It opens on March 5 and runs through April 21. Siegwarth is the Carter’s Luce Curatorial Fellow for Photographs. 

This is a detail from Mitch Epstein’s Weeping Beech, Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Brooklyn (2011). It’s in the Amon Carter’s collection. At over five-feet-by-four-feet,  it’s a great example of how big trees have motivated photographers to make bigger prints since at least the mid-19th-century when Carleton Watkins pioneered mammoth-plate photography.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunesSoundCloud or RSS. See images of artworks discussed on the program.


On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, Katherine Siegwarth discusses her new Amon Carter Museum exhibition "Big Pictures." The exhibition goes back to the 1860s to demonstrate that size in photography pre-dates the ‘Big Germans’ and that photographers have almost always wanted to make their prints bigger. It opens on March 5 and runs through April 21. Siegwarth is the Carter’s Luce Curatorial Fellow for Photographs. 
This is a 1864 Charles Leander Weed from the Amon Carter’s collection: The Vernal Fall, 350 Feet High. Yo-semite Valley, Mariposa County, Cal. Back in 1859, Weed had became the first photographer to visit Yosemite. While there, he took a series of 10-inch-by-14-inch pictures.
In 1861, Carleton Watkins became the second photographer to travel into Yosemite. Watkins’ pictures weight in at about 22-inches-by-18-inches, almost three times the size of Weed’s pictures, a factor that helped them become world-famous.
Sometime between Watkins’ first visit to Yosemite and 1864, Weed got himself a bigger camera and went back to the valley. This is one of the pictures he took on that later trip.
How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, SoundCloud or RSS. See images of artworks discussed on the program.

On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, Katherine Siegwarth discusses her new Amon Carter Museum exhibition "Big Pictures." The exhibition goes back to the 1860s to demonstrate that size in photography pre-dates the ‘Big Germans’ and that photographers have almost always wanted to make their prints bigger. It opens on March 5 and runs through April 21. Siegwarth is the Carter’s Luce Curatorial Fellow for Photographs. 

This is a 1864 Charles Leander Weed from the Amon Carter’s collection: The Vernal Fall, 350 Feet High. Yo-semite Valley, Mariposa County, Cal. Back in 1859, Weed had became the first photographer to visit Yosemite. While there, he took a series of 10-inch-by-14-inch pictures.

In 1861, Carleton Watkins became the second photographer to travel into Yosemite. Watkins’ pictures weight in at about 22-inches-by-18-inches, almost three times the size of Weed’s pictures, a factor that helped them become world-famous.

Sometime between Watkins’ first visit to Yosemite and 1864, Weed got himself a bigger camera and went back to the valley. This is one of the pictures he took on that later trip.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunesSoundCloud or RSS. See images of artworks discussed on the program.