Posts tagged photography

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Jo Ann Callis.

If you know the work of Jeff Wall or Gregory Crewdson or Marilyn Minter, you should know Callis, whose work anticipated theirs. Starting in the early 1970s Callis has constructed both black-and-white and color photographs that consider, sex, sexuality, pleasure and more pleasure.

Aperture has just published “Other Rooms,” a new book of Callis’ investigations of the nude body and sexuality, mostly from the mid-1970s. Amazon offers it for $54. And on Tuesday, June 17th, Callis and Lesley A. Martin will discuss the project at Aperture on West 27th Street in New York. Their conversation starts at 6:30pm.

Callis is one of the most important photographers of her generation. In two thousand nine the J. Paul Getty Museum presented a retrospective of her work titled "Woman Twirling." Callises are in the permanent collection of museums such as the Museum of Modern Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. 

The image at the top of this post is from Callis’ “Animal/Food” series, which Callis and host Tyler Green discuss on this week’s program in the context of Matisse’s goldfish paintings. The second image is Matisse’s Goldfish (1912) and the bottom image is Matisse’s Still-Life with Goldfish (1912).

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


Stephen Shore

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Stephen Shore. 

This week Phaidon published Shore’s latest book, "From Galilee to the Negev," which includes pictures Shore has taken of Israel and the West bank from 1994 to 2011. The book also features essays about individual pictures by writers such as Yossi Klein Halevi, Jane Kramer, Steve Sabella and Eyal Weizman. It’s available from Amazon for $67, $33 off the cover price. 

Shore is one of America’s most honored photographers. His books "American Surfaces" and "Uncommon Places" are two of the most influential books in American photography. In 1971 he was the first living photographer to have an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and he was included in the Tate Modern’s first exhibition of photography in 2003. On Wednesday, May 21 you can hear more from Shore when he talks with Met photo curator Jeff Rosenheim at the International Center of Photography.

In addition to the Shore images that are below and that will be on MANPodcast.com all week, you can see more Shores at his website. 

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. 

Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

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Carleton Watkins: The Stanford Albums

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights "Carleton Watkins: The Stanford Albums" at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University. The exhibition, which is on view through August 17, features 83 mammoth plates from three unique Watkins albums in the special collections of the Stanford University Library. It was curated by Cantor curator Elizabeth Kathleen Mitchell and George Philip LeBourdais.

On the occasion of the exhibition, Stanford University Press has published “Carleton Watkins: The Stanford Albums,” an exhibition catalogue that features essays from three of the guests on this week’s program: Alexander Nemerov, Erik Steiner and Corey Keller. The book features what may be the largest reproductions of Watkins mammoth-plate pictures ever published. At $35, it’s a bargain. (Expect the price to go up when the book goes into a second printing.) 

Alexander Nemerov is a professor of the arts and humanities at Stanford. His most recent books are “To Make a World: George Ault and 1940s America,” the catalogue to the exhibition of the same title he curated at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, “Acting in the Night: Macbeth and the Places of the Civil War.” His most recent book is “Wartime Kiss: Visions of the Moment in the 1940s,” a look at the power of American photographs and films from the 1940s. 

Erik Steiner is the creative director of the Spatial History Project, a part of the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis at Stanford. His recent projects include "Shaping the West," which examined how the railroad impacted the construction of space in the 19th-century West.

Corey Keller is a curator at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and one of America’s top experts on 19th-century photography. Keller’s exhibitions include “Brought to Light: Photography and the Invisible, 1840-1900,” which explored the use of photography in 19th-century science. Her other exhibitions include surveys of Henry Wessel and Francesca Woodman. 

On the second segment, Los Angeles County Museum of Art curator Ilona Katzew joins the program to discuss Spanish colonial art. On May 16-17 she’ll be presenting at a symposium at New York’s Frick Collection titled, "The Americas Revealed: Collecting Colonial and Modern Latin American Art in the United States." Katzew is widely considered a leading expert on the subject. Her new galleries at LACMA are a highlight of the institution’s permanent collection spaces. 

In 2011-12 she organized "Contested Visions is the Spanish Colonial World." For a limited time, the must-own catalogue of that exhibition is available from LACMA for just $10. 

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. 

Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

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Italian Futurism

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights "Italian Futurism, 1909-1944: Reconstructing the Universe" at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. It is the first overview of Italian Futurism to be presented in the United States. It’s on view through September 1.

The first guest is Guggenheim curator Vivien Greene, who organized the show. Greene’s previous exhibitions include “The Vorticists: Rebel Artists in London and New York, 1914–18,” (which she co-organized with Mark Antliff), “Utopia Matters: From Brotherhoods to Bauhaus” and “Divisionism/Neo-Impressionism: Arcadia and Anarchy.”

This is a detail from Filippo Masoero’s Descending over Saint Peter, ca. 1927–37 (possibly 1930–33). It’s an example of futurism’s late embrace of photography. Host Tyler Green and Greene discussed this issue at length on this week’s program.

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on the show.

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On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, artist Alison Rossiter discusses her work. Rossiter is featured in "What Is a Photograph?" an exhibition at the International Center of Photography in New York. The exhibition, which is on view through May 4, was curated by Carol Squiers. It looks at how over the last 40 years artists, often more interested in making an artwork than in specifically making a photograph, have probed the question of what a photograph can be.
Rossiter is a New York-based artist whose recent work has explored uses of expired photographic paper. She has exhibited extensively throughout the United States and Canada over the last 30 years and her work is in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the George Eastman House, the National Gallery of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.
This is Rossiter’s Defender Velour Black, expired January 1924, processed in 2013 (#2). On the program, Rossiter explains to host Tyler Green how she makes works such as this using expired photographic paper.
Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 
See more images of art discussed on the show.

On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, artist Alison Rossiter discusses her work. Rossiter is featured in "What Is a Photograph?" an exhibition at the International Center of Photography in New York. The exhibition, which is on view through May 4, was curated by Carol Squiers. It looks at how over the last 40 years artists, often more interested in making an artwork than in specifically making a photograph, have probed the question of what a photograph can be.

Rossiter is a New York-based artist whose recent work has explored uses of expired photographic paper. She has exhibited extensively throughout the United States and Canada over the last 30 years and her work is in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the George Eastman House, the National Gallery of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

This is Rossiter’s Defender Velour Black, expired January 1924, processed in 2013 (#2). On the program, Rossiter explains to host Tyler Green how she makes works such as this using expired photographic paper.

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on the show.


On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, artist Alison Rossiter discusses her work. Rossiter is featured in "What Is a Photograph?" an exhibition at the International Center of Photography in New York. The exhibition, which is on view through May 4, was curated by Carol Squiers. It looks at how over the last 40 years artists, often more interested in making an artwork than in specifically making a photograph, have probed the question of what a photograph can be.
Rossiter is a New York-based artist whose recent work has explored uses of expired photographic paper. She has exhibited extensively throughout the United States and Canada over the last 30 years and her work is in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the George Eastman House, the National Gallery of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.
This is Rossiter’s Kilborn Acme Kruxo, exact expiration date unknown, ca. 1940s, processed in 2013. On the program, Rossiter explains to host Tyler Green how she makes works such as this using expired photographic paper.
Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 
See more images of art discussed on the show.

On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, artist Alison Rossiter discusses her work. Rossiter is featured in "What Is a Photograph?" an exhibition at the International Center of Photography in New York. The exhibition, which is on view through May 4, was curated by Carol Squiers. It looks at how over the last 40 years artists, often more interested in making an artwork than in specifically making a photograph, have probed the question of what a photograph can be.

Rossiter is a New York-based artist whose recent work has explored uses of expired photographic paper. She has exhibited extensively throughout the United States and Canada over the last 30 years and her work is in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the George Eastman House, the National Gallery of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

This is Rossiter’s Kilborn Acme Kruxo, exact expiration date unknown, ca. 1940s, processed in 2013. On the program, Rossiter explains to host Tyler Green how she makes works such as this using expired photographic paper.

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on the show.


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features John Divola. Three Southern California museums are featuring a Divola retrospective this fall: The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (through July 6, 2014), the Pomona College Museum of Art (through December 22) and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art(through January 12, 2014). The exhibition catalogue was produced by the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and includes contributions from curators at all three museums, plus an interview with Divola conducted by the Tate’s Simon Baker. It is published by Delmonico Books Prestel (and it’s just $35 on Amazon).

The exhibitions are the first museum shows to examine Divola’s four-decade career. His influential work is among the first to merge painting, photography and conceptual practice. 

This is a detail from Divola’s As Far As I Could Get, 10 Seconds,  12_15_2010, 3:29 PM to 3:42 PM PST, 34.166301,-116.033714 (2010). Divola and host Tyler Green discuss this series on this weeks’ show!

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. See images of art discussed on the show here, or see even more on Divola’s website. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast at: 


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Museum of Modern Art curator Anne Umland. Her new exhibition, "Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926-1938," is on view at MoMA through January 12, 2014. The exhibition catalogue, published by MoMA, is excellent.

Umland is one of the world’s top curators of modern art. Her exhibitions include 2011’s “Picasso: Guitars 1912-1914,” 2008’s “Joan Miro: Painting and Anti-Painting 1927-37,” and a 2001 retrospective of Alberto Giacometti.

This is Magritte’s Attempting the Impossible (1928) and a photograph by an anonymous photographer of Magritte posing with the painting. (The picture was plainly ‘art designed’ by Magritte.) For more on another way in which Magritte was interested in photography, see this post on Modern Art Notes.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast at iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or via RSS. Stream the program at MANPodcast.com.


Jack Whitten

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Jack Whitten. Earlier this week the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University opened "Light Years: Jack Whitten, 1971-73." Curated by Katy Siegel, the exhibition examines the period during which Whitten began to use tools to “process” paint on canvas. The exhibition also includes small drawing studies and small works on canvas in which Whitten uses paint as a collage medium. “Light Years” will be on view through December 15.

In addition, Alexander Gray Associates in Chelsea  is debuting recent Whitten paintings in a show that will run through October 12. Whitten is also included in"Blues for Smoke," the Bennett Simpson-curated exhibition that will be at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus through December 29.

Whitten is among the leading painters of the post-abstract expressionism era. His work is distinguished by Whitten’s interest in experimenting with new techniques to apply and new ways to use paint on canvas. The Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego will debut a Whitten retrospective in 2014.

On the second segment, Tehran-based artist Gohar Dashti talks about her photographs and how they address being Iranian in the wake of the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988). Dashti was born in the war’s first year and believes that her generation is substantially defined by that armed conflict. Her work is on view now in"She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World" at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The exhibition was curated by Kristen Gresh and will be on view through January 12, 2014. Amazon offers the show’s excellent catalogue for $30.

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The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. Special thanks to the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden library for its help with this week’s show.

Listen to this week’s program: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. See images of art discussed on the program. Also:

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David Maisel :: Photography

Check out the website of artist David Maisel, the second guest on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast. His new book "Black Maps: American Landscape and the Apocalyptic Sublime," is just out from Steidl. An exhibition by the same title of Maisel’s work is on view at the University of Colorado Art Museum through May 11. 

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast via iTunesSoundCloudStitcher or RSS. See more images of art discussed on the program.