Posts tagged museum of fine arts houston

Robert Heinecken

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition runs through September 7.

This is a detail from one of Heinecken’s 120 MANSMAGs, re-made periodicals in which Heinecken addressed the use of sex and sexuality to sell pretty much everything, from sex itself to household products. The MANSMAG works also highlight the often empty interchangeability of pornographic images.

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews, opens tomorrow, and runs through September 7.

While Heinecken is best-known for his interest in and his critiques of sex in media, he also made a substantial body of work about violence in media, and the ways in which violence and sex were (often unintentionally) juxtaposed to help sell products. Today on MANPodcast.com we’ll be spotlighting Heinecken’s violence-themed work.

These are two-page spreads from Heinecken’s Periodical #1 (1969). The first image features a report on the My Lai massacre and a pornographic image, and the second features Heinecken’s use of a news photograph of a Cambodian soldier holding two severed heads. Heinecken’s ‘periodicals’ were modified magazines that were often inserted back into newsstands for unsuspecting consumers to purchase. They address many issues, including the sometimes surreal juxtaposition of sex and news coverage of violence. 

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews, opens tomorrow, and runs through September 7.

While Heinecken is best-known for his interest in and his critiques of sex in media, he also made a substantial body of work about violence in media, and the ways in which violence and sex were (often unintentionally) juxtaposed to help sell products. Today on MANPodcast.com we’ll be spotlighting Heinecken’s violence-themed work.

This is Heinecken’s Child Guidance Toys (1965, with a detail from the piece), which reproduces an actual advertisement from a Los Angeles newspaper. It points out the often ridiculous ways in which violence is used to sell products, even to children— and how uncomfortable that can become. This piece is in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.


Robert Heinecken

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews, opens on Saturday, and runs through September 7.

While Heinecken is best-known for his interest in and his critiques of sex in media, he also made a substantial body of work about violence in media, and the ways in which violence and sex were (often unintentionally) juxtaposed to help sell products. Today on MANPodcast.com we’ll be spotlighting Heinecken’s violence-themed work.

This is an untitled, undated off-set lithograph Heinecken made. It features a typical example of Heinecken using one of his ‘favorite’ news images — a Cambodian soldier holding two severed heads — and presenting it in a single image with the sort of news magazine advertisement that would have ‘accompanied’ the photograph. This piece is in the collection of the Center for Creative Photography, Tucson, Ariz.

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews, opens tomorrow, and runs through September 7.

While Heinecken is best-known for his interest in and his critiques of sex in media, he also made a substantial body of work about violence in media, and the ways in which violence and sex were (often unintentionally) juxtaposed to help sell products. Today on MANPodcast.com we’ll be spotlighting Heinecken’s violence-themed work.

These are two-page spreads from Heinecken’s Periodical #5 (1971) that feature Heinecken’s use of a news photograph of a Cambodian soldier holding two severed heads. Heinecken’s ‘periodicals’ were modified magazines that were often inserted back into newsstands for unsuspecting consumers to purchase. They address many issues, including the sometimes surreal juxtaposition of sex and news coverage of violence. 

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.


Robert Heinecken

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews, opens on Saturday, and runs through September 7.

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

 Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


Would you believe that there has been just one career-length survey of Georges Braque’s work in the United States since 1950? On February 13 — a week from today — the Museum of Fine Arts Houston opens "Georges Braque: A Retrospective," which will feature 75 works from throughout Braque’s career. The exhibition debuted at the Grand Palais in Paris.
The exhibition will Braque’s first great fauve painting, Le Canal Saint-Martin (Saint-Martin Canal) (1906). On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, Alison de Lima Greene talks about the MFAH’s Braque presentation, and why Braque remained interested in the painter-and-model subject for so long.
de Lima Green is the MFAH’s curator of contemporary art and  special projects. Among the exhibitions she has organized are “Czech Modernism: 1900-1945,” “Twentieth-Century American Sculpture at the White House,” and “Kenneth Noland: The Nature of Color.”
Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 
See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Would you believe that there has been just one career-length survey of Georges Braque’s work in the United States since 1950? On February 13 — a week from today — the Museum of Fine Arts Houston opens "Georges Braque: A Retrospective," which will feature 75 works from throughout Braque’s career. The exhibition debuted at the Grand Palais in Paris.

The exhibition will Braque’s first great fauve painting, Le Canal Saint-Martin (Saint-Martin Canal) (1906)On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, Alison de Lima Greene talks about the MFAH’s Braque presentation, and why Braque remained interested in the painter-and-model subject for so long.

de Lima Green is the MFAH’s curator of contemporary art and  special projects. Among the exhibitions she has organized are “Czech Modernism: 1900-1945,” “Twentieth-Century American Sculpture at the White House,” and “Kenneth Noland: The Nature of Color.”

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.


Would you believe that there has been just one career-length survey of Georges Braque’s work in the United States since 1950? On February 13 — a week from today — the Museum of Fine Arts Houston opens "Georges Braque: A Retrospective," which will feature 75 works from throughout Braque’s career. The exhibition debuted at the Grand Palais in Paris.
The exhibition will feature three The Duet (1937, above), one of Braque’s great paintings on the subject of painter-and-model. On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, Alison de Lima Greene talks about the MFAH’s Braque presentation, and why Braque remained interested in the painter-and-model subject for so long.
de Lima Green is the MFAH’s curator of contemporary art and  special projects. Among the exhibitions she has organized are “Czech Modernism: 1900-1945,” “Twentieth-Century American Sculpture at the White House,” and “Kenneth Noland: The Nature of Color.”
Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 
See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Would you believe that there has been just one career-length survey of Georges Braque’s work in the United States since 1950? On February 13 — a week from today — the Museum of Fine Arts Houston opens "Georges Braque: A Retrospective," which will feature 75 works from throughout Braque’s career. The exhibition debuted at the Grand Palais in Paris.

The exhibition will feature three The Duet (1937, above), one of Braque’s great paintings on the subject of painter-and-model. On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, Alison de Lima Greene talks about the MFAH’s Braque presentation, and why Braque remained interested in the painter-and-model subject for so long.

de Lima Green is the MFAH’s curator of contemporary art and  special projects. Among the exhibitions she has organized are “Czech Modernism: 1900-1945,” “Twentieth-Century American Sculpture at the White House,” and “Kenneth Noland: The Nature of Color.”

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.


Would you believe that there has been just one career-length survey of Georges Braque’s work in the United States since 1950? On February 13 — a week from today — the Museum of Fine Arts Houston opens "Georges Braque: A Retrospective," which will feature 75 works from throughout Braque’s career. The exhibition debuted at the Grand Palais in Paris.

The exhibition will feature three of Braque’s late, great ‘Billiard Table’ paintings, including the two featured here. At the top of this post is Billard Table (1945) from the Tate. Below it is Billiard Table (1944) from the Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou.

On the second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, Alison de Lima Greene talks about the MFAH’s Braque presentation, which will be on view through May 11. de Lima Green is the MFAH’s curator of contemporary art and  special projects. Among the exhibitions she has organized are “Czech Modernism: 1900-1945,” “Twentieth-Century American Sculpture at the White House,” and “Kenneth Noland: The Nature of Color.”

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.


Robert Bechtle

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Robert Bechtle.

Bechtle’s work is featured in "Still Life: 1970s Photorealism" at the Yale University Art Gallery. The exhibition, which is drawn from YUAG’s collection, was curated by Cathleen Chaffee and will be on view through March 9. It also includes work by Robert Cottingham, Ralph Goings, Duane Hanson, Malcolm Morley, Gerhard Richter, and John Salt. Bechtle is also exhibiting new paintings and drawings at New York’s Gladstone Gallery through February 22.

In 2005 Bechtle was the subject of a San Francisco Museum of Modern Art-organized retrospective that traveled to the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth and to the Corcoran Gallery of Art. His work is in numerous museum collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

On the second segment, Alison de Lima Greene talks about "Georges Braque: A Retrospective," which opens at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston on Feb. 13. The MFAH is the only American venue for the exhibition, which debuted at the Grand Palais in Paris. It will be on view in Houston through May 11. This is only the second comprehensive Braque retrospective shown in the US since 1950. (The Guggenheim presented a Braque survey in 1988.)

de Lima Green installed ‘Braque’ at the MFAH, where she is curator of contemporary art and  special projects. Among the exhibitions she has organized are “Czech Modernism: 1900-1945,” “Twentieth-Century American Sculpture at the White House,” and “Kenneth Noland: The Nature of Color.”

Listen to or download this week’s MAN Podcast above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Image: Bechtle, '64 Valiant (detail), 1971. Collection of Yale University Art Gallery.

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast