Posts tagged baltimore museum of art

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights the exhibition of Henri Matisse’s cut-outs at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. 

MoMA’s "Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs" is the most extensive presentation of Matisse’s cut-outs ever. It was organized by MoMA and the Tate Modern, where it was on view over the spring and summer. MoMA will offer it through February 8, 2015. The exhibition is accompanied by a stellar catalogue that is particularly rich with documentary photographs taken in and around the places where Matisse worked in cut paper. (It was published in the U.S. by MoMA and is available from Amazon for just $38.) The exhibition was curated by a bi-national team that included Nicholas Cullinan and Flavia Frigeri at the Tate and by MoMA conservator Karl Buchberg, curator Samantha Friedman and this week’s first guest, Jodi Hauptman. 

Hauptman is a senior curator at MoMA. Most recently she has organized exhibitions of Georges Seurat’s drawings and Odilon Redon. 

On the second segment, Washington University-based art historian John Klein, one of America’s top Matisse experts, discusses how Matisse migrated projects from cut-outs to decorative art installations. Klein is just finishing up a book titled “Matisse’s Late Decorations and the Essential Quality of Art,” which will be published by Yale. 

These are Matisse’s two most famous Blue Nudes. At top is Blue Nude II (1952), one of Matisse’s late cut-outs, and below it the painting many historians consider to be the most influential painting of the 20th century, Blue Nude (Memory of Biskra) (1907). On this week’s program, Hauptman and host Tyler Green discuss the relationship between the two works.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Serge Guilbaut, the editor of the recently published "Chatting with Henri Matisse: The Lost 1941 Interview." This week’s show was taped live at Getty Center.
"Chatting with Matisse," which was published by Getty Publications, is a fascinating book: In 1941 art historian Pierre Courthion conducted an extensive interview with Matisse that was seen at the time as a vital assessment of his career. But just weeks before the book was to come out, Matisse suppressed its publication. Scholars have known about the interview for some time, but it’s never been published, or even widely available, until now. This beautiful new publication includes essays by Guilbaut, Yve-Alain Bois and Laurence Bertrand Dorleac. Chris Miller translated the interview.
Guilbaut is professor emeritus at The University of British Columbia. His previous projects include the book “How New York Stole the Idea of Modern Art: Abstract Expressionism, Freedom, and the Cold War.”
Today on MANPodcast.com we’ll be featuring paintings and drawings Matisse made of Lydia Delectorskaya. From 1935 until the end of his life in 1954, Delectorskaya served as Matisse’s secretary, model — and maybe paramour. She was intensely involved with the 1941 interview featured on this week’s program, especially working to edit the text. 
This is Matisse’s second major painting featuring Delectorskaya, Pink Nude (1935). It’s in the collection of the Baltimore Museum of Art.
How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast at: 
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Serge Guilbaut, the editor of the recently published "Chatting with Henri Matisse: The Lost 1941 Interview." This week’s show was taped live at Getty Center.

"Chatting with Matisse," which was published by Getty Publications, is a fascinating book: In 1941 art historian Pierre Courthion conducted an extensive interview with Matisse that was seen at the time as a vital assessment of his career. But just weeks before the book was to come out, Matisse suppressed its publication. Scholars have known about the interview for some time, but it’s never been published, or even widely available, until now. This beautiful new publication includes essays by Guilbaut, Yve-Alain Bois and Laurence Bertrand Dorleac. Chris Miller translated the interview.

Guilbaut is professor emeritus at The University of British Columbia. His previous projects include the book “How New York Stole the Idea of Modern Art: Abstract Expressionism, Freedom, and the Cold War.”

Today on MANPodcast.com we’ll be featuring paintings and drawings Matisse made of Lydia Delectorskaya. From 1935 until the end of his life in 1954, Delectorskaya served as Matisse’s secretary, model — and maybe paramour. She was intensely involved with the 1941 interview featured on this week’s program, especially working to edit the text. 

This is Matisse’s second major painting featuring Delectorskaya, Pink Nude (1935). It’s in the collection of the Baltimore Museum of Art.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast at: 


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Serge Guilbaut, the editor of the recently published "Chatting with Henri Matisse: The Lost 1941 Interview." This week’s show was taped live at Getty Center.
"Chatting with Matisse," which was published by Getty Publications, is a fascinating book: In 1941 art historian Pierre Courthion conducted an extensive interview with Matisse that was seen at the time as a vital assessment of his career. But just weeks before the book was to come out, Matisse suppressed its publication. Scholars have known about the interview for some time, but it’s never been published, or even widely available, until now. This beautiful new publication includes essays by Guilbaut, Yve-Alain Bois and Laurence Bertrand Dorleac. Chris Miller translated the interview.
Guilbaut is professor emeritus at The University of British Columbia. His previous projects include the book “How New York Stole the Idea of Modern Art: Abstract Expressionism, Freedom, and the Cold War.”
Today on MANPodcast.com we’ll be featuring paintings and drawings Matisse made of Lydia Delectorskaya. From 1935 until the end of his life in 1954, Delectorskaya served as Matisse’s secretary, model — and maybe paramour. She was intensely involved with the 1941 interview featured on this week’s program, especially working to edit the text. 
This is Matisse’s first painting of Delectorskaya, Blue Eyes (1935). It’s in the collection of the Baltimore Museum of Art.
How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast at: 
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Serge Guilbaut, the editor of the recently published "Chatting with Henri Matisse: The Lost 1941 Interview." This week’s show was taped live at Getty Center.

"Chatting with Matisse," which was published by Getty Publications, is a fascinating book: In 1941 art historian Pierre Courthion conducted an extensive interview with Matisse that was seen at the time as a vital assessment of his career. But just weeks before the book was to come out, Matisse suppressed its publication. Scholars have known about the interview for some time, but it’s never been published, or even widely available, until now. This beautiful new publication includes essays by Guilbaut, Yve-Alain Bois and Laurence Bertrand Dorleac. Chris Miller translated the interview.

Guilbaut is professor emeritus at The University of British Columbia. His previous projects include the book “How New York Stole the Idea of Modern Art: Abstract Expressionism, Freedom, and the Cold War.”

Today on MANPodcast.com we’ll be featuring paintings and drawings Matisse made of Lydia Delectorskaya. From 1935 until the end of his life in 1954, Delectorskaya served as Matisse’s secretary, model — and maybe paramour. She was intensely involved with the 1941 interview featured on this week’s program, especially working to edit the text. 

This is Matisse’s first painting of Delectorskaya, Blue Eyes (1935). It’s in the collection of the Baltimore Museum of Art.

How to listen: Download the show to your PC/mobile device. Subscribe to The MAN Podcast at: 


This second guest on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast is Sarah Oppenheimer, a New York-based artist whose architectural interventions challenge our perception of space.
This week the Baltimore Museum of Art will re-open its remodeled contemporary wing. As part of the re-opening the museum will unveil two commissioned works by Oppenheimer that will be permanently on view at the museum. W-12 (2012), shown in several pictures here, is installed across from this untitled 1962 Tony Smith painting (which is in the BMA’s collection). It’s a striking juxtaposition, one that reminds the viewer that what she sees in the Smith is kind of how she’s seeing through the Oppenheimer.
To download the program to your PC/mobile device, click here. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes or RSS. Also, check out — and ‘like’ — our new Facebook page!

This second guest on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast is Sarah Oppenheimer, a New York-based artist whose architectural interventions challenge our perception of space.

This week the Baltimore Museum of Art will re-open its remodeled contemporary wing. As part of the re-opening the museum will unveil two commissioned works by Oppenheimer that will be permanently on view at the museum. W-12 (2012), shown in several pictures here, is installed across from this untitled 1962 Tony Smith painting (which is in the BMA’s collection). It’s a striking juxtaposition, one that reminds the viewer that what she sees in the Smith is kind of how she’s seeing through the Oppenheimer.

To download the program to your PC/mobile device, click here. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes or RSS. Also, check out — and ‘like’ — our new Facebook page!


This second guest on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast is Sarah Oppenheimer, a New York-based artist whose architectural interventions challenge our perception of space.

This week the Baltimore Museum of Art will re-open its remodeled contemporary wing. As part of the re-opening the museum will unveil two commissioned works by Oppenheimer that will be permanently on view at the museum. This is a detail of one of them, W-12, as seen from the second floor of the BMA (no Photoshop here!): As the viewer looks forward, on the left side she sees across the museum’s staircase. As she looks forward and to the right, she sees what’s… beneath her!

To download the program to your PC/mobile device, click here. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes or RSS. Also, check out — and ‘like’ — our new Facebook page!


Sculptor/architectural intervener Sarah Oppenheimer is the second guest on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast. We discussed this piece — her brand-new P-0101 (2012), one of two commissions permanently installed at the Baltimore Museum of Art — on this week’s show. It’s installed in/between the museum’s Cone Wing of modern art and its newly remodeled contemporary wing.
Download the show, subscribe on iTunes.

Sculptor/architectural intervener Sarah Oppenheimer is the second guest on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast. We discussed this piece — her brand-new P-0101 (2012), one of two commissions permanently installed at the Baltimore Museum of Art — on this week’s show. It’s installed in/between the museum’s Cone Wing of modern art and its newly remodeled contemporary wing.

Download the show, subscribe on iTunes.


Sculptor/architectural mess-with-er Sarah Oppenheimer is the second guest on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast. We discussed this piece — her brand-new W-12 (2012) at the Baltimore Museum of Art — on this week’s show. (If it looks like the guy in the staircase is looking up but can see down, it’s because that’s exactly what the piece does…)
Download the show, subscribe on iTunes.

Sculptor/architectural mess-with-er Sarah Oppenheimer is the second guest on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast. We discussed this piece — her brand-new W-12 (2012) at the Baltimore Museum of Art — on this week’s show. (If it looks like the guy in the staircase is looking up but can see down, it’s because that’s exactly what the piece does…)

Download the show, subscribe on iTunes.


This second guest on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast is Sarah Oppenheimer, a New York-based artist whose architectural interventions challenge our perception of space.

This week the Baltimore Museum of Art will re-open its remodeled contemporary wing. As part of the re-opening the museum will unveil two commissioned works by Oppenheimer that will be permanently on view at the museum. This is one of them, W-12, as seen from one of three vantage points: The museum’s contemporary wing stairwell. If it looks like the camera is positioned to look up, that’s because it is. If it seems as if the camera is seeing someone on the floor below, that’s because it is. Pretty wild, no? 

To download the program to your PC/mobile device, click here. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes or RSS. Also, check out — and ‘like’ — our new Facebook page!


This second guest on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast is Sarah Oppenheimer, a New York-based artist whose architectural interventions challenge our perception of space.

Next week the Baltimore Museum of Art will re-open its remodeled contemporary wing. As part of the re-opening the museum will unveil two commissioned works by Oppenheimer that will be permanently on view at the museum. This is one of them, P-0101 (2012). It consists of a giant diagonal cut in a limestone wall and an aluminum-and-glass insertion. It’s less peek-a-boo than it is ‘where am I?’

To download the program to your PC/mobile device, click here. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes or RSS. Also, check out — and ‘like’ — our new Facebook page!


This second guest on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast is Sarah Oppenheimer, a New York-based artist whose architectural interventions challenge our perception of space.

Next week the Baltimore Museum of Art will re-open its remodeled contemporary wing. As part of the re-opening the museum will unveil two commissioned works by Oppenheimer that will be permanently on view at the museum. This is one of them, W-12 (2012). There are no photo-tricks going on here: If the viewer looks through the aperture to the left, she sees straight ahead into a staircase. Through the right aperture, she sees the BMA gallery immediately below where she is standing. Art as real-world special-effect!

To download the program to your PC/mobile device, click here. Subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes or RSS. Also, check out — and ‘like’ — our new Facebook page!