Posts tagged audio

French & German Expressionism

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Los Angeles County Museum of Art curator Timothy O. Benson and Mary Miss.

Benson is the curator of "Expressionism in Germany and France: From Van Gogh to Kandinsky." The show reveals how expressionism, typically considered a German movement, had its roots in late 19th-century French art and then presents how central European artists discovered, learned from and expanded upon developments in France. 

It’s on view through September 14. The exhibition’s catalogue, published by Prestel, is terrific. Amazon offers it for $50.

The second segment is a conversation with Mary Miss, the artist who founded City as Living Laboratory, an organization that provides a platform for artists, scientists, planners, policy makers and the general public to be more environmentally aware. In conjunction with Marfa Dialogues St. Louis, a program of the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, Miss will be leading a walk through central Saint Louis on August 2. Marfa Dialogues St. Louis events run from July 30 through August 3. 

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. Special thanks to Jennifer Gould and Miranda Sklaroff for their help this week.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

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Judy Fiskin

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin. 

Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. 

I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 

Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim.

In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 

This is a picture from Fiskin’s "Dingbat" (1982-83) series. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

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This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin. 
Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. 
I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 
Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim.
In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 
This is a picture from Fiskin’s "Desert Photographs" (1976) series. 
How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
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via RSS. 

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin. 

Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. 

I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 

Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim.

In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 

This is a picture from Fiskin’s "Desert Photographs" (1976) series. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


Judy Fiskin

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin and curator Michael Duncan. 

Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. This is a still from Fiskin’s piece.

I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 

Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim. In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 

Fiskin started working in video after experiencing health problems that made photography challenging. That went pretty well right from the start: Her first major video, 1997’s Diary of a Midlife Crisis, was screened at film festivals in the United States and Europe, and won the Silver Spire award at the San Francisco International Film Festival.  

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


Judy Fiskin

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin and curator Michael Duncan. 

Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7.

I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 

Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim. In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 

Fiskin started working in video after experiencing health problems that made photography challenging. That went pretty well right from the start: Her first major video, 1997’s Diary of a Midlife Crisis, was screened at film festivals in the United States and Europe, and won the Silver Spire award at the San Francisco International Film Festival.  

On the second segment, Michael Duncan discusses “An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle,” an exhibition he co-curated with Christopher Wagstaff. The show debuted at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento, traveled to the Grey Art Gallery at New York University, and is on view through August 17 at the American University Museum in Washington, DC. It will conclude its tour this fall at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. Siglio Press recently published Duncan’s marvelous "O! Tricky Cad and Other Jessoterica," a visual wander through Jess’s exquisitely composed collages.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. Special thanks to Jennifer Gould and Miranda Sklaroff for their help this week.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


A.L. Steiner

This is a still from A.L. Steiner and Narcissister’s 12-minute video Winter/Spring Collectionwhich was commissioned by MOCAtv in 2013. (Nota bene: It’s NSFW.) On this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, host Tyler Green and Steiner discuss this piece.

Steiner’s newest photo-installation, titled Accidenthell, is included in "Made in L. A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of Los Angeles-based artists. It considers, among other things, elements of the America’s corporate underbelly, from energy extraction to the private prison industry. The exhibition, which was curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. 

Steiner is a member of several artist collectives and artist-groups and regularly collaborates with other artists. “Community Action Center” has been screened at the Museum of Modern Art, the Andy Warhol Museum, and at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


A.L. Steiner

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features A. L. Steiner, whose newest piece is included in "Made in L. A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of Los Angeles-based artists.

Steiner’s photo-installation Accidenthell considers, among other things, elements of the America’s corporate underbelly, from energy extraction to the private prison industry. The exhibition, which was curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. 

Steiner is a member of several artist collectives and artist-groups and regularly collaborates with other artists. The film “Community Action Center,” which Steiner made with A.K. Burns has been screened at the Museum of Modern Art, the Andy Warhol Museum, and at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The ‘poster’ for the film is pictured here. Check back later today for the trailer!

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


A.L. Steiner

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features A. L. Steiner, whose newest piece is included in "Made in L. A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of Los Angeles-based artists.

Steiner’s photo-installation Accidenthell (detail above) considers, among other things, elements of the America’s corporate underbelly, from energy extraction to the private prison industry. The exhibition, which was curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. 

Steiner is a member of several artist collectives and artist-groups and regularly collaborates with other artists. The film “Community Action Center,” which Steiner made with A.K. Burns has been screened at the Museum of Modern Art, the Andy Warhol Museum, and at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and Steiner was included in the most recent Whitney Biennial. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

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Deborah Grant, James Ensor

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features artist Deborah Grant and J. Paul Getty Museum curator Scott Allan.  

Grant makes paintings deeply rooted in art history, but takes as a significant goal the adding of new names and bodies of work to the roster of artists we know. Her work mixes folk traditions, the work of famous artists and our cultural history to build narratives that use our past to address our present. Her work is included in "When the Stars Begin to Fall; Imagination and the American South," a group show at the Studio Museum in Harlem that was curated by Thomas J. Lax. The show is open through this weekend and then travels to the NSU Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale in August. Earlier this year The Drawing Center exhibited "Deborah Grant: Christ You Know it Ain’t Easy!!", which was curated by Claire Gilman. 

Next, Allan, the curator of "The Scandalous Art of James Ensor," at the J. Paul Getty Museum. It will be on view through September 7. The show focuses on Ensor’s wild, groundbreaking work of the 1880s and 1890s, and places the artist’s two greatest works in the context of Ensor’s larger project. The Getty’s own Christ’s Entry into Brussels in 1889 is famous and well-known, but the exhibition also includes Ensor’s 1887 The Temptation of St. Anthony, a mammoth drawing never before exhibited in the United States. It’s in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago, to which this exhibition will travel after it’s in LA. 

The image above shows a center-foreground detail of Christ’s Entry in which a drum major-cum-bishop enters the city.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

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Jonathan Brown

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features art historian Jonathan Brown.

Widely considered the top Hispanist in the world, Brown has written a new memoir titled “In the Shadow of Velazquez: A Life in Art History.” In the book Brown starts at the beginning of his life, as the child of contemporary art collectors in Springfield, Mass., continues through his discovery of Spain, Spanish art, and artists such as Ribera, El Greco and, of course, Diego Velazquez. It’s a lively story of discovery and engagement that might alternatively titled ‘Letters to a Young Art Historian.’ Published by Yale University Press, the book will be available early next month. Amazon offers it now for $36.

Brown’s previous books include tomes on Velazquez, Goya, Murillo, the Spanish Habsburg Court, Zurbaran and the Yale University Press Pelican History of Art that covers Spanish art from 1500-1700. Later this year Yale will publish “Painting in Latin America, 1550-1820,” which Brown co-wrote with Luisa Elena Alcala.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston curator Mari Carmen Ramirez talks about Jesus Rafael Soto’s final work, The Houston Penetrable. Commissioned from Soto a decade ago, the work is now on view for the first time. It will remain in MFAH’s Mies van der Rohe-designed Law Building through September 1. Ramirez is the MFAH’s curator of Latin American art and the director of the museum’s International Center for the Arts of the Americas. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

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