Posts tagged art

The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Michael Duncan. 
Duncan and host Tyler Green discuss “An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle,” an exhibition Duncan co-curated with Christopher Wagstaff. The show debuted at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento, traveled to the Grey Art Gallery at New York University, and is on view through August 17 at the American University Museum in Washington, DC. It will conclude its tour this fall at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. Siglio Press recently published Duncan’s marvelous "O! Tricky Cad and Other Jessoterica," a visual wander through Jess’s exquisitely composed collages.
This is Jess’ 1960 cover for Robert Duncan’s “The Opening of the Field,” a book of poetry published by Grove Press.
How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 

The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Michael Duncan. 

Duncan and host Tyler Green discuss “An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle,” an exhibition Duncan co-curated with Christopher Wagstaff. The show debuted at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento, traveled to the Grey Art Gallery at New York University, and is on view through August 17 at the American University Museum in Washington, DC. It will conclude its tour this fall at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. Siglio Press recently published Duncan’s marvelous "O! Tricky Cad and Other Jessoterica," a visual wander through Jess’s exquisitely composed collages.

This is Jess’ 1960 cover for Robert Duncan’s “The Opening of the Field,” a book of poetry published by Grove Press.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Michael Duncan. 
Duncan and host Tyler Green discuss “An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle,” an exhibition Duncan co-curated with Christopher Wagstaff. The show debuted at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento, traveled to the Grey Art Gallery at New York University, and is on view through August 17 at the American University Museum in Washington, DC. It will conclude its tour this fall at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. Siglio Press recently published Duncan’s marvelous "O! Tricky Cad and Other Jessoterica," a visual wander through Jess’s exquisitely composed collages.
This is Jess’ Montana Xibalba: Translation #2 (1963), from the collection of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth.
How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 

The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Michael Duncan. 

Duncan and host Tyler Green discuss “An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle,” an exhibition Duncan co-curated with Christopher Wagstaff. The show debuted at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento, traveled to the Grey Art Gallery at New York University, and is on view through August 17 at the American University Museum in Washington, DC. It will conclude its tour this fall at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. Siglio Press recently published Duncan’s marvelous "O! Tricky Cad and Other Jessoterica," a visual wander through Jess’s exquisitely composed collages.

This is Jess’ Montana Xibalba: Translation #2 (1963), from the collection of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


Judy Fiskin

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin. 

Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. 

I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 

Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim.

In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 

This is a picture from Fiskin’s "Dingbat" (1982-83) series. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin. 

Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. 

I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 

Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim.

In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 

This is the cover of the book (top) and an example of a two-page layout from the book. (The publication was designed by Catherine Lorenz.) The book faithfully reproduces Fiskin’s method of presenting her pictures: at two-and-three-quarters inches square, surrounded by white space. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin. 
Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. 
I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 
Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim.
In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 
This is a picture from Fiskin’s "Desert Photographs" (1976) series. 
How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin. 

Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. 

I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 

Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim.

In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 

This is a picture from Fiskin’s "Desert Photographs" (1976) series. 

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Michael Duncan. 
Duncan and host Tyler Green discuss “An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle,” an exhibition Duncan co-curated with Christopher Wagstaff. The show debuted at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento, traveled to the Grey Art Gallery at New York University, and is on view through August 17 at the American University Museum in Washington, DC. It will conclude its tour this fall at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. Siglio Press recently published Duncan’s marvelous "O! Tricky Cad and Other Jessoterica," a visual wander through Jess’s exquisitely composed collages.
This is Jess’ Sent on the VIIth Wave (1979). .
How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 

The second segment of this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Michael Duncan. 

Duncan and host Tyler Green discuss “An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle,” an exhibition Duncan co-curated with Christopher Wagstaff. The show debuted at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento, traveled to the Grey Art Gallery at New York University, and is on view through August 17 at the American University Museum in Washington, DC. It will conclude its tour this fall at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. Siglio Press recently published Duncan’s marvelous "O! Tricky Cad and Other Jessoterica," a visual wander through Jess’s exquisitely composed collages.

This is Jess’ Sent on the VIIth Wave (1979). .

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


Judy Fiskin

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin and curator Michael Duncan. 

Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. This is a still from Fiskin’s piece.

I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 

Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim. In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 

Fiskin started working in video after experiencing health problems that made photography challenging. That went pretty well right from the start: Her first major video, 1997’s Diary of a Midlife Crisis, was screened at film festivals in the United States and Europe, and won the Silver Spire award at the San Francisco International Film Festival.  

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin and curator Michael Duncan. 

Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7. All three images above are stills from I’ll Remember Mama. The first still is from the opening of the piece, from work the audio clip in this week’s program comes.

I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 

Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim. In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 

Fiskin started working in video after experiencing health problems that made photography challenging. That went pretty well right from the start: Her first major video, 1997’s Diary of a Midlife Crisis, was screened at film festivals in the United States and Europe, and won the Silver Spire award at the San Francisco International Film Festival.  

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


Judy Fiskin

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Judy Fiskin and curator Michael Duncan. 

Fiskin’s newest work, I’ll Remember Mama (2013) is featured in "Made in L.A. 2014," the Hammer Museum’s biennial of art from Los Angeles. The exhibition, curated by Connie Butler and Michael Ned Holte, is on view through September 7.

I’ll Remember Mama cleverly jumps off from George Stevens’ 1948 film "I Remember Mama," which was nominated for five Academy Awards, to consider the ways in which Fiskin’s mother has aged, and how that’s reflected in their relationship. 

Fiskin came to prominence in the 1970s as a photographer who was part of the New Topographics movement. While she was not included in the famous all-male exhibition of that title, Fiskin’s examinations of vernacular architecture in southern California, New York, and beyond earned her significant acclaim. In 2011, J. Paul Getty Museum curator Virginia Heckert published "Some Aesthetic Decisions: The Photographs of Judy Fiskin" in conjunction with the exhibition “In Focus: Los Angeles, 1945-1980,” a Pacific Standard Time exhibition of the Getty’s holdings of Southern California photographs. The 360-page monograph includes a terrific interview Fiskin did with artist John Divola. 

Fiskin started working in video after experiencing health problems that made photography challenging. That went pretty well right from the start: Her first major video, 1997’s Diary of a Midlife Crisis, was screened at film festivals in the United States and Europe, and won the Silver Spire award at the San Francisco International Film Festival.  

On the second segment, Michael Duncan discusses “An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle,” an exhibition he co-curated with Christopher Wagstaff. The show debuted at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento, traveled to the Grey Art Gallery at New York University, and is on view through August 17 at the American University Museum in Washington, DC. It will conclude its tour this fall at the Pasadena Museum of California Art. Siglio Press recently published Duncan’s marvelous "O! Tricky Cad and Other Jessoterica," a visual wander through Jess’s exquisitely composed collages.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license. Special thanks to Jennifer Gould and Miranda Sklaroff for their help this week.

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


Wondering’s who’s up on this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast? Here’s a hint about the identity of our first guest. As always, this week’s show will post tomorrow at around noon ET.

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