Posts tagged MoMA

Sigmar Polke

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights "Alibis: Sigmar Polke, 1963-2010" at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews now, opens to the public on April 19 and will remain on view through August 3. The exhibition’s catalogue was published by MoMA.

Joining the program to discuss the exhibition is Kathy Halbreich, who curated “Alibis.” Halbreich is MoMA’s associate director and the former director of the Walker Art Center. Her last exhibition before “Alibis” was a 2010 installation of contemporary art from MoMA’s collection that was co-curated with Christophe Cherix.

The image above is a detail from Polke’s Supermarkets (1976), which Halbreich and host Tyler Green discuss on this week’s program.

On the second segment, Olaf Peters discusses "Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany, 1937," which is on view through June 30. Peters is a professor at the Peters is a professor at the Institute for Art History and Archaeology in Europe at the Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg. He curated “Degenerate Art” and edited its excellent exhibition catalogue, which was published by Prestel.

Listen to or download this week’s program above, on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights "Alibis: Sigmar Polke, 1963-2010" at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews now, opens to the public on April 19 and will remain on view through August 3. The exhibition’s catalogue was published by MoMA.
Joining the program to discuss the exhibition is Kathy Halbreich, who curated “Alibis.” Halbreich is MoMA’s associate director and the former director of the Walker Art Center. Her last exhibition before “Alibis” was a 2010 installation of contemporary art from MoMA’s collection that was co-curated with Christophe Cherix.
This is The Hunt for Taliban and Al Qaeda (2002), in which Polke spotlights how the tactical movement of information has become more important in modern warfare than the tactical movement of troops. It’s hanging in the MoMA atrium.
On the second segment, Olaf Peters discusses "Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany, 1937," which is on view through June 30. Peters is a professor at the Peters is a professor at the Institute for Art History and Archaeology in Europe at the Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg. He curated “Degenerate Art” and edited its excellent exhibition catalogue, which was published by Prestel.
The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license.
Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights "Alibis: Sigmar Polke, 1963-2010" at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews now, opens to the public on April 19 and will remain on view through August 3. The exhibition’s catalogue was published by MoMA.

Joining the program to discuss the exhibition is Kathy Halbreich, who curated “Alibis.” Halbreich is MoMA’s associate director and the former director of the Walker Art Center. Her last exhibition before “Alibis” was a 2010 installation of contemporary art from MoMA’s collection that was co-curated with Christophe Cherix.

This is The Hunt for Taliban and Al Qaeda (2002), in which Polke spotlights how the tactical movement of information has become more important in modern warfare than the tactical movement of troops. It’s hanging in the MoMA atrium.

On the second segment, Olaf Peters discusses "Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany, 1937," which is on view through June 30. Peters is a professor at the Peters is a professor at the Institute for Art History and Archaeology in Europe at the Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg. He curated “Degenerate Art” and edited its excellent exhibition catalogue, which was published by Prestel.

The Modern Art Notes Podcast is an independent production of Modern Art Notes Media. The program is edited by Wilson Butterworth. The MAN Podcast is released under this Creative Commons license.

Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:


Robert Heinecken

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition runs through September 7.

This is a detail from one of Heinecken’s 120 MANSMAGs, re-made periodicals in which Heinecken addressed the use of sex and sexuality to sell pretty much everything, from sex itself to household products. The MANSMAG works also highlight the often empty interchangeability of pornographic images.

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


This is Heinecken Explains Heinecken,” a 45-minute film by Phil Savenick. It’s a well-edited documentary featuring Robert Heinecken’s own voice and work, a particular treat as Heinecken was a teacher par excellence. On this week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast, both guests discuss Heinecken’s role as an educator. 

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition runs through September 7.

The first guest on the program is MoMA curator Eva Respini, who has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.


Robert Heinecken

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition runs through September 7.

Early in his career Heinecken made a number of ‘photograph-sculptures’ in which he presented human forms on an armature that insisted upon viewer interaction. This is Figure in Six Selections (1965), which asks a viewer to arrange a woman’s body as a painter or photographer might ask a model to arrange herself. 

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.
Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition runs through September 7.
One of Heinecken’s best-known and most consistent critiques was that media — and especially advertising — used women’s bodies to sell whatever it had to sell (regardless of whether that was the day’s news or bras). That point is clear in this Hans Bellmer-esque work titled V.N. Pinup (1968) at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. It’s in the MoMA show.
Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.
On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?
Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”
Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 
See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition runs through September 7.

One of Heinecken’s best-known and most consistent critiques was that media — and especially advertising — used women’s bodies to sell whatever it had to sell (regardless of whether that was the day’s news or bras). That point is clear in this Hans Bellmer-esque work titled V.N. Pinup (1968) at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. It’s in the MoMA show.

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.


This is the cover to the exhibition catalogue for "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini. Amazon offers the catalogue for $35.
Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. The exhibition runs through September 7.
Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.
On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?
Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”
Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:
iTunes; 
SoundCloud; 
Stitcher; or
via RSS. 
See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

This is the cover to the exhibition catalogue for "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini. Amazon offers the catalogue for $35.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. The exhibition runs through September 7.

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews, opens tomorrow, and runs through September 7.

While Heinecken is best-known for his interest in and his critiques of sex in media, he also made a substantial body of work about violence in media, and the ways in which violence and sex were (often unintentionally) juxtaposed to help sell products. Today on MANPodcast.com we’ll be spotlighting Heinecken’s violence-themed work.

These are two-page spreads from Heinecken’s Periodical #1 (1969). The first image features a report on the My Lai massacre and a pornographic image, and the second features Heinecken’s use of a news photograph of a Cambodian soldier holding two severed heads. Heinecken’s ‘periodicals’ were modified magazines that were often inserted back into newsstands for unsuspecting consumers to purchase. They address many issues, including the sometimes surreal juxtaposition of sex and news coverage of violence. 

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.


This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews, opens tomorrow, and runs through September 7.

While Heinecken is best-known for his interest in and his critiques of sex in media, he also made a substantial body of work about violence in media, and the ways in which violence and sex were (often unintentionally) juxtaposed to help sell products. Today on MANPodcast.com we’ll be spotlighting Heinecken’s violence-themed work.

This is Heinecken’s Child Guidance Toys (1965, with a detail from the piece), which reproduces an actual advertisement from a Los Angeles newspaper. It points out the often ridiculous ways in which violence is used to sell products, even to children— and how uncomfortable that can become. This piece is in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.


Robert Heinecken

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast spotlights conceptual photographer Robert Heinecken with Museum of Modern Art curator Eva Respini.

Heinecken was a pioneer in using media to critique media, a practice that Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert have adapted for a television age. Heinecken rarely took his own photographs, instead using existing images and long-familiar photographic and printing techniques to create new semi-collages made up of multiple images. Heinecken’s work is the subject of "Robert Heinecken: Object Matter," a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. The exhibition is in member previews, opens on Saturday, and runs through September 7.

While Heinecken is best-known for his interest in and his critiques of sex in media, he also made a substantial body of work about violence in media, and the ways in which violence and sex were (often unintentionally) juxtaposed to help sell products. Today on MANPodcast.com we’ll be spotlighting Heinecken’s violence-themed work.

This is an untitled, undated off-set lithograph Heinecken made. It features a typical example of Heinecken using one of his ‘favorite’ news images — a Cambodian soldier holding two severed heads — and presenting it in a single image with the sort of news magazine advertisement that would have ‘accompanied’ the photograph. This piece is in the collection of the Center for Creative Photography, Tucson, Ariz.

Eva Respini has organized exhibitions of Cindy Sherman and with Vik Muniz. Her many projects are chronicled at her website. She organized “Heinecken” with curatorial fellow Drew Sawyer.

On the second segment, Museum of Fine Arts Houston Anne Wilkes Tucker discusses Heinecken as a conceptualist. On the occasion of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s 1999 Heinecken retrospective, Tucker gave a lecture in which she posited that in the future the conceptual nature of Heinecken’s practice would be more valued and more useful to other artists than it was then. Did her prediction come true?

Tucker was most recently a guest on The MAN Podcast to discuss an MFAH exhibition she co-curated titled, “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath.”

Listen to or download the Smithson MAN Podcast on SoundCloud, via direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

See more images of art discussed on this week’s program.

Source SoundCloud / Modern Art Notes Podcast